TECS Graduate Handbook


Welcome from the Director of Graduate Programs

Dr. Zhang stands smiling in front of the NC State University sealWelcome to our Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science (TECS) at North Carolina State University. I’m excited to tell you about our graduate programs and the research opportunities within TECS and encourage you to apply to one of our challenging graduate degrees. All of the areas I outline below are shown in detail on the TECS Grad website and I invite you to browse this site. In particular, check out our Graduate Student Handbook links. We developed this online resource to guide you through the entire graduate program as well as highlight our many resources that are available to you. However, if you have any questions, do not hesitate to
contact us.
Why choose Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science for your Graduate Education? The Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science Department has a long and distinguished history of teaching, graduate research, and service to industry. Our faculty members are engineers and chemists from literally all over the world. We have backgrounds in organic, physical and analytical chemistry, and biomedical, materials science, chemical, mechanical, textile, industrial and even aeronautical engineering. If you spend any time in our Department you will quickly realize that we are friendly and welcoming group and enjoy contributing to the vibrant campus community at NC State. For instance, faculty and students together enjoy helping to organize and perform in an annual music event with proceeds going to select charities. Our Department is fortunate to have an outstanding staff that supports our approximately 50 Masters students, 80 PhD students, and 40 interdisciplinary faculty members. At the Masters level, we have a Masters of Textile Chemistry and a Masters of Textile Engineering. While most students complete a thesis, we also have a non-thesis option in both degrees. Our MS in TC is available for study online. Many of our Masters students go on to pursue PhDs. We have two PhD programs in the Wilson College of Textiles, Fiber & Polymer Science and Textile Technology Management. In TECS, we are genuinely engaged in interdisciplinary research. Our research areas are quite broad and are designed to maximize our positive impact on the world. A few examples include:

  • The chemistry and engineering of high performance polymers, fibers and composites
  • Innovative materials and products from nonwoven structures
  • Green chemistry – focused on the modeling and development of new polymers, dyes and processes with low environmental impact
  • Polymers and dyes for use in energy production
  • Textile products and materials for defense applications
  • Smart textiles
  • Functional dyes for solar cells
  • Polymers and textiles for biomedical applications
  • Functional surface chemistry
  • Forensic textiles and chemistry
  • Novel nanofibers for various applications

Some of our advanced research, teaching and outreach is focused into one of the 70+ Centers and Institutes at North Carolina State University. The Textile Protection and Comfort Center is recognized as a world leader in garment protection and comfort. The Nonwovens Institute has unmatched capabilities in graduate research, development and innovation in garment protection and all aspects of nonwoven materials. Our faculty members are also leaders in the growing Forensic Sciences Institute at NC State. Our Department is part of the Wilson College of Textiles, which has laboratory and pilot scale production facilities that are unmatched in an academic setting. We are located on NC State’s award winning Centennial Campus. Centennial Campus is a model for academic, industry, and government partnerships. Our department is not only known for its strength in research and partnerships with industry. We are also committed to teaching and close mentoring. Recently, we developed a unique Teaching Certificate that a growing number of our students are pursuing. We are proud of the Teaching Certificate program, especially as it enables close mentoring between our faculty and our students who are eager to improve their communication skills. The teaching program is part of our Graduate Scholars initiative, which aims to help our students develop key professional skills to prepare them for the next phases of their professional lives. Our students are from all over the globe. Many of our students publish in top peer-reviewed journals and present at international conferences. We’re so proud of the number of awards and honors our students earn, and we have a strong and well-connected alumni base – many of whom are leaders in their chosen field. Our faculty, staff and students, both current and alumni, are a diverse and welcoming family. Perhaps one day you’ll join us! Please contact me any time. I look forward to hearing from you. Xiangwu Zhang
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Admission Requirements and Procedures

Successful applicants will have a science or engineering background. Those pursuing Textile Engineering must have an undergraduate engineering degree or demonstrated proficiency in the appropriate calculus-based sciences and core technical competencies. If these requirements are not met, additional coursework may be required prior to admission into the program. Those pursuing Textile Chemistry must have an undergraduate degree in chemistry, textiles or an equivalent degree with demonstrated proficiency in the appropriate calculus-based math and core chemistry competencies, including physical chemistry and organic chemistry. If these requirements are not met, additional coursework may be required prior to admission into the program. Applicants are also expected to meet the following minimum requirements: an unweighted GPA of 3.0 or First Class Honors in the Bachelor’s degree; GRE scores in the 65th percentile; a TOEFL score of 213 for the computer-based, and 80 for internet-based (international students) OR IELTS scores with an overall band score of at least 6.5; and three letters of reference. Additional information can be found by clicking on these links:

Application Deadlines For US Citizens and permanent residents

Fall: June 25th | Spring: November 25th

Application Deadlines For Internationals

Fall: March 1st | Spring: July 15th

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Tuition and Fees

The TECS Graduate Program is aware of the concern that graduate students have in obtaining funding to pay for tuition and be provided a stipend in order to relieve a student’s financial burden when attending graduate school. The TECS department has limited stipends for Teaching Assistantships (TAs). Most students are also hired as Research Assistants (RAs) after their first semester as a Graduate Student. In some cases, a TA or RA scholarship may be offered to top students upon acceptance into the Graduate Program. In these cases, where possible, graduate student’s tuition is covered under the Graduate Student Support Program (GSSP). Student fees, however, are the personal responsibility of all students unless there’s a second sponsor specifically for fees.

Account payments are only accepted electronically via MyPack Portal, under the “For Students” tab, in “Cashier’s Office”, in “Account Summary”. From there you can make a payment with an electronic check, or a credit card (with fee). Out-of-state tuition may be paid by a research project or teaching assistantship for students who are not residents of North Carolina, providing they are making satisfactory progress. Out-of-state US students should be aware that they need to get started on their residency status AS SOON AS THEY ARRIVE, in order to be approved for in-state residency for tuition purposes the following year (see the “Residency” section).
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Quick Facts About Research in the TECS Department

  1. TECS’ 40 faculty members mentor about 50 Masters and 80 Ph.D. students, who hail from all over the globe, including: Bangladesh, China, Colombia, Germany, India, Iran, UK, Egypt, Pakistan, Syria, Turkey, and the U.S.A.
  2. TECS faculty secured over $9,000,000 in research funding in 2013 – 2014.
  3. TECS faculty members have been awarded more than 25 patents in the last five years.
  4. TECS faculty and students publish more than 100 peer-reviewed and conference research papers each year.
  5. Dr. Al Tonelli is one of the 40 most prolific authors (#13 in 2007) in the polymer journal, Macromolecules [40,1,2007]. Dr. Tonelli has published over 400 peer-reviewed publications.
  6. Dr. Sam Hudson has one of the most cited research papers at NC State (>1,100 citations): “Stimuli-responsive polymers and their bioconjugates.” Eun Seok Gil and Samuel M. Hudson, Progress in Polymer Science,29:1173-1222 (2004).
  7. In his first 20 months as a faculty member in TECS, Dr. Philip Bradford won $1 Million in research funding as a PI and co-PI in the area of carbon nanotube textiles research.
  8. Dr. Wendy Krause is a leader in the Women in Science and Engineering at NC State; approximately 50% of graduate research students are female.
  9. Kelly Stano, one of our Ph.D. students working in Dr. Bradford’s research group, won a NSF Graduate Research Fellowship worth $120,000. Four TECS graduates have won NSF Graduate Research Fellowships in recent years.
  10. TECS faculty members have spun off several companies in recent years as a result of their research, including LaamScience, HueMetrix, Katharos, and 3Tex.
  11. TECS faculty members are leaders in three of NC State’s Centers and Institutes: The Nonwovens Institute, The Textile Protection and Comfort Center, and the Forensic Sciences Institute.
  12. The Olney Medal, the top research award bestowed by the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists, has been won by four TECS faculty members in the last 10 years (Drs. Keith Beck, Harold Freeman, Rolf Keuhni, and Brent Smith).

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The TECS Graduate Professional Development Program

While the primary goals of our Graduate Programs are focused graduate research and education, the TECS Department recognizes that all of us (students, staff and faculty) should continually seek to improve our personal and professional skills. The goal of our Graduate Professional Development Program is to help our graduate students develop into effective, well-rounded scientists who are fully prepared to join whatever line of work they ultimately choose after graduation. Learn more about TECS and NC State programs and job searching resources. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact the Director of Graduate Professional Development.
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TECS Teaching Certificate

In applying for teaching positions, many universities ask for teaching experience, a teaching philosophy statement and teaching portfolios. To assist our graduate scholars, TECS has worked with NCSU Graduate School to put together a teaching certificate that provides teaching training, experience, and assistance in developing a portfolio and philosophy. Students who participate in this program receive the Certificate of Accomplishment in Teaching (CoAT) by attending workshops developed by the Graduate School and by teaching laboratory or lecture classes in TECS. This experience is also an excellent way of demonstrating good communication skills, which many employers desire.
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Professional Employment Assistance

When applying for an employment opportunity, employers usually require a resume (industry) or curriculum vitae (academia). Although there are many resources available for how to create these, there is little assistance for how to describe your skills in a way that distinguishes you from the many other applicants. We provide guidance and individual assistance in preparing these documents and cover letters for applications as well as helping each student identify their unique set of skills. Often researchers have difficulty identifying their accomplishments and will put their research in their resume in a way that is not effective (e.g. “Researched cotton bleaching technology.”) rather than stronger statements (e.g. “Developed new process for bleaching cotton that reduces water, time, and damage to cotton fibers.”). We plan to expand this effort to include industrial internships and a website with job openings and job hunting tips.
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Student Career Services

The Director of Student Career Services for the Wilson College of Textiles is Mr. Kent Hester. Kent has decades of experience in helping both current students and college alumni in achieving success in finding high quality employment. This includes organizing an annual Wilson College of Textiles Career Fair, where many companies visit the College for on-campus interviews.
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Graduate Seminar Series

During the Fall and Spring semesters, College Graduate Seminar Committee organizes weekly seminars featuring prominent research scientists and industry leaders. While students are required to attend the seminar for at least two semesters, all students and faculty in the College are encouraged to attend continuously. The seminars are excellent ways to interact with leaders in their fields and broaden our perspectives on a wide variety of topics.
Seminars may be viewed online.
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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

View the Graduate School’s FAQs. You can find additional answers to questions in The Graduate School’s New Student Survival Guide.
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Master of Science in Textile Chemistry (MS TC)

The Master of Science in Textile Chemistry degree program emphasizes the fundamental principles of polymer science, dyeing and finishing technology, color science, dye chemistry, and fiber formation. Our program is highly relevant to many of the chemical, retail and textile industries, as well as environmental, medical and forensic science. Graduates of Textile Chemistry are recruited by a broad range of companies, such as DuPont, Proctor & Gamble, Nike, General Motors, fiber and textile companies all over the globe, and state and federal agencies involved with forensic science.
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Master of Science in Textile Chemistry (MS TC): Option A (Thesis Degree) Program Requirements

Master’s Thesis In order to complete the degree in a reasonable time, students should identify a topic and start work on a thesis early. Identification of a thesis topic should be done during or before the second semester in residence. It is the student’s responsibility to take the initiative to engage in activities that will lead to the identification of a thesis topic. While there is no unique sequence of steps that should be taken in order to arrive at the definition of an appropriate problem, a few suggestions may be helpful. A student may enter the graduate program with a definite interest. A student may be able to identify a thesis topic from course work or readings. Some portion of the research in which a faculty member is engaged may be developed as a thesis. Each professor has interests and ideas that may provide stimulating suggestions. Graduate students should contact faculty members; they welcome the opportunity to get acquainted with students. Other sources of stimulation and advice are discussions with other students, attendance at professional meetings, and familiarity with the relevant literature. Finally, in carrying out term paper requirements for courses, students have an opportunity to get the background understanding and information which will enable them to sense a problem that is both interesting and of reasonable scope. The Master’s thesis is intended to be a focused research exercise on a manageable topic. It should be focused on a well-defined topic with restricted scope. At the same time, it must be carried out with care and rigor. Peer-reviewed publications and at least one conference paper is expected. The committee will supervise the work throughout the preparation of the thesis with the chair or co-chairs taking major responsibility. The student should consult with the chair and the committee in connection with any major problems, and keep them informed of progress. It is beneficial for all concerned that concise (monthly) reports are provided to the committee to keep them abreast of progress and any problems that need to be addressed. Regular meetings with the chair or committee are also usually very helpful. Be sure to take full advantage of workshops that are made available by The Graduate School. For instance, MS students should take this Electronic Theses and Dissertations workshop at the end of their first year. Once the thesis has been completed, it should be carefully edited and tentatively approved by the committee. The student may then proceed to arrange a suitable time and place for the oral examination according to the rules of the Graduate School, using MyPackPortal. All theses are submitted electronically to the Graduate School. Once the thesis is defended, it must be approved by the Advisory Committee with original signatures of the members of the Advisory Committee on the title page. Once the student has the signed title page, she/he can meet with the Graduate Thesis/Dissertation editor. Before final approval, the thesis will be reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that it conforms to the specifications prescribed in the “Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Guide.” The editor will give the student a date by which the thesis must be submitted electronically in order for the student to graduate in a given semester. Students should plan to provide a final copy of the thesis to each committee member, if they request it.
Master’s Thesis Defense and Oral Examination Candidates for the Master’s degree must pass a comprehensive oral examination to demonstrate to the Advisory Committee that they possess a reasonable mastery of the subject matter of the major and supporting fields and that this knowledge can be used with promptness and accuracy. The oral examination includes an oral presentation about the thesis and questions focused on the project. Authorization to hold the examination is requested through The Graduate School. The examination may not be held until all other requirements, except completion of the course work for the final semester, are satisfied. A mutually agreeable time of no less than two hours must be scheduled for the examination. A unanimous vote of approval by the Advisory Committee is required for passing the oral examination. However, approval of the examination may be conditioned upon the completion of additional work to the satisfaction of the Advisory Committee. Failure of a student to pass the examination terminates the student’s graduate program unless otherwise unanimously recommended by the Advisory Committee. Oral examinations for Master’s degree candidates are open to all faculty, students and staff. Discussion and decisions regarding the student’s performance are confidential to the Advisory Committee. Graduate School requirements for the Master’s degree are outlined in the North Carolina State University Graduate Catalog. Students are urged to review carefully the section pertaining to the degree sought.

Advisory Committee  At the Master’s level, the Advisory Committee shall consist of at least: 1) two members from the TECS graduate faculty, and 2) a third committee member who is a NC State University Graduate Faculty Member, but is not part of the TECS Core Faculty.

MS TC Option A (Thesis Degree) Program Requirements Students must take a minimum of 32 credit hours to fulfill the degree requirements including:

  1. At least 5 courses from the approved TC offerings table. Substitutions must be approved by the Director of Graduate Programs.
  2. Six hours of Thesis Research (TC 630, TC 695).
  3. Two semesters of TC 601 (Graduate Seminar).
  4. Up to three courses (9 credit hours) are to be chosen from supporting areas. The courses may be selected from a single field, and will thus be designated as a Minor (e.g. statistics, chemistry, textile technology, or biomedical engineering) or from more than one discipline (interdisciplinary minor). No more than one of these courses may be a 400-level course.

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Master of Science in Textile Chemistry (MS TC): Option B (Non-Thesis) Program Requirements

Non-Thesis (MS Option B) In order to obtain a MS TC degree under Option B, students must take a minimum of 35 credit hours, including 2 semesters (6 credit hours) of independent study, TC 630, to the satisfaction of the student’s advisor.  Generally, research and thesis preparation courses (TC 695, 699), which may be used in the MS Option A (thesis-based) track, may not be used to fulfill the course work requirements for the MS Option B degree. An exception is made for MS students on the way to a PhD degree. These individuals may count 6 hours of thesis research toward their degree.Students enrolled in this program option will develop a Plan of Graduate Work under the direction of his/her faculty advisor. Students in the Option B programs are not eligible for research assistantships.
MS TC Option B (Non-Thesis Degree) Program Requirements Students must take a minimum of 35 credit hours to fulfill the degree requirements including:
1. At least 6 courses from the approved TC courses table. Substitutions must be approved by the Director of Graduate Programs.
2. Six hours of TC 630 (Independent Study).
3. Two semesters of TC 601 (Graduate Seminar)
4. Up to three courses (9 credit hours) are to be chosen from supporting areas.
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Master of Science in Textile Chemistry (MS TC): Online Option B (Non-Thesis) Degree

A growing number of off-campus professionals from around the world have shown interest in studying for a Masters in Textile Chemistry via distance. The MS TC (Option B) may be taken entirely by distance. Our department offers a graduate level courses online and more are being added. The requirements for the MS TC
(Option B)
are the same whether courses are taken via distance or not. For more information contact the Director of Graduate Programs.
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Accelerated Bachelor’s Master’s Programs (ABM): BS / MS in Polymer and Color Chemistry / Textile Chemistry

Accelerated Bachelor’s Master’s Programs (ABM) The Graduate School encourages and enables high performing undergraduate students to enter the Graduate School significantly prior to completing their BS degree. It also enables early graduation with a master’s degree by allowing double counting up to 12 credits for courses required in both the BS and MS degree. The faculty in the Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science participate in the ABM program because we believe in helping our top performing undergraduate chemists, engineers, and technologists to take on new challenges in their education and personal development. The ABM program is an outstanding opportunity to earn a challenging thesis or non-thesis master’s as early as possible and at reduced cost. Because eligible students have a very high GPA, we do not require the GRE to be taken for our ABM programs. Application Process: Eligible undergraduate students must take the following steps in their fourth or fifth semester:

  1. Contact the TECS Director of Graduate Programs stating their interest in applying to the ABM program, providing their student I.D. number, and requesting a meeting to discuss the Accelerated Bachelor’s Master’s program requirements.
  2. Complete a BS / MS Plan of Work form for the BS / MS signed by the student, and approved by the Director of Graduate Programs and the
    Director of Undergraduate Programs.
  3. Apply to the Graduate School online once the Plan of Work has been approved.

Note 1: Students must check the box to indicate they are applying to the ABM program. Note 2: Students must indicate that the requested admission date is the semester following their anticipated bachelor’s degree conferral semester. Note 3: Students are not required to take the GRE as they must have a GPA = 3.5 or higher.
BS / MS in Polymer and Color Chemistry / Textile Chemistry Eligibility: Students majoring in the BS Polymer and Color Chemistry degree (engineering math and physics tracks) who are in their fourth or fifth semester and have earned a GPA of 3.5 or higher are eligible to apply for acceptance into our ABM PCC / TC Program. Learn more about the program and its requirements.
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Approved Courses for Master of Science in Textile Chemistry (MS TC)

Course ID

Title

Credit Hours

TMS 500 Fiber and Polymer Microscopy

3

TC 502 Textile Wet Processing

3

TT 503 Materials, Polymers, and Fibers used in Nonwovens

3

TC 530 The Chemistry of Textile Auxiliaries

3

TC (MSE) 561 Organic Chemistry of Polymers

3

TC 565 Polymer Applications and Technology

3

TE (BME) 566 Polymeric Biomaterials Engineering

3

TE 570 Polymer Physics

3

TC (TE) 589 Special Studies in Textile Engineering Science

3

TC 704 Fiber Formation—Theory and Practice

3

TC 705 Theory of Dyeing

3

TC 706 Color Science

3

TC 707 Color Laboratory

3

TC 720 Chemistry of Dyes and Color

3

TC 721 Dye Synthesis Laboratory

3

TC (CH,MAT) 762 Physical Chemistry of High Polymer – Bulk Properties

3

TMS 762 Physical Properties of Fiber Forming Polymers, Fibers and Fibrous Structures

3

TMS 763 Characterization of Structure of Fiber Forming Polymers

3

TC 771 Polymer Microstructures, Conformations and Properties

3

TC (MSE) 772 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers – Solution Properties

3

TC 791 Special Topics in Textile Science

3

FPS 792 Special Topics in Fiber Science

3

TC (TE) 792 Special Topics in Fiber Science

3

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Master of Science in Textile Engineering (MS TE)

The Master of Science in Textile Engineering degree program offers unique educational and research opportunities within the domain of textile materials, structures, machines, and processes. The program is interdisciplinary in nature, drawing upon mathematical sciences, other engineering disciplines, and the physical sciences. Current research activities in textile engineering include electro-mechanical design, inventory and supply chain control, studies in thermal and fluid sciences, polymer and fiber science, biomedical applications of textiles, textile composites, and pollution prevention. Since our program encompasses such diverse fields of study, many of our students opt to co-major in other programs at NC State. Examples of these co-majors are statistics, bio-medical engineering, and industrial engineering.
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Master of Science in Textile Engineering (MS TE): Option A (Thesis Degree) Program Requirements

Master’s Thesis In order to complete the degree in a reasonable time, students should identify a topic and start work on a thesis early. Identification of a thesis topic should be done during or before the second semester in residence. It is the student’s responsibility to take the initiative to engage in activities that will lead to the identification of a thesis topic. While there is no unique sequence of steps that should be taken in order to arrive at the definition of an appropriate problem, a few suggestions may be helpful. A student may enter the graduate program with a definite interest. A student may be able to identify a thesis topic from course work or readings. Some portion of the research in which a faculty member is engaged may be developed as a thesis. Each professor has interests and ideas that may provide stimulating suggestions. Graduate students should contact faculty members; they welcome the opportunity to get acquainted with students. Other sources of stimulation and advice are discussions with other students, attendance at professional meetings, and familiarity with the relevant literature. Finally, in carrying out term paper requirements for courses, students have an opportunity to get the background understanding and information which will enable them to sense a problem that is both interesting and of reasonable scope. The Master’s thesis is intended to be a focused research exercise on a manageable topic. It should be focused on a well-defined topic with restricted scope. At the same time, it must be carried out with care and rigor. Peer-reviewed publications and at least one conference paper is expected. The committee will supervise the work throughout the preparation of the thesis with the chair or co-chairs taking major responsibility. The student should consult with the chair and the committee in connection with any major problems, and keep them informed of progress. It is beneficial for all concerned that concise (monthly) reports are provided to the committee to keep them abreast of progress and any problems that need to be addressed. Regular meetings with the chair or committee are also usually very helpful. Be sure to take full advantage of workshops that are made available by The Graduate School. For instance, MS students should take this Electronic Theses and Dissertations workshop at the end of their first year. Once the thesis has been completed, it should be carefully edited and tentatively approved by the committee. The student may then proceed to arrange a suitable time and place for the oral examination according to the rules of the Graduate School, using MyPackPortal. All theses are submitted electronically to the Graduate School. Once the thesis is defended, it must be approved by the Advisory Committee with original signatures of the members of the Advisory Committee on the title page. Once the student has the signed title page, she/he can meet with the Graduate Thesis/Dissertation editor. Before final approval, the thesis will be reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that it conforms to the specifications prescribed in the “Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Guide.” The editor will give the student a date by which the thesis must be submitted electronically in order for the student to graduate in a given semester. Students should plan to provide a final copy of the thesis to each committee member, if they request it.
Master’s Thesis Defense and Oral Examination Candidates for the Master’s degree must pass a comprehensive oral examination to demonstrate to the Advisory Committee that they possess a reasonable mastery of the subject matter of the major and supporting fields and that this knowledge can be used with promptness and accuracy. The oral examination includes an oral presentation about the thesis and questions focused on the project. Authorization to hold the examination is requested through The Graduate School. The examination may not be held until all other requirements, except completion of the course work for the final semester, are satisfied. A mutually agreeable time of no less than two hours must be scheduled for the examination. A unanimous vote of approval by the Advisory Committee is required for passing the oral examination. However, approval of the examination may be conditioned upon the completion of additional work to the satisfaction of the Advisory Committee. Failure of a student to pass the examination terminates the student’s graduate program unless otherwise unanimously recommended by the Advisory Committee. Oral examinations for Master’s degree candidates are open to all faculty, students and staff. Discussion and decisions regarding the student’s performance are confidential to the Advisory Committee. Graduate School requirements for the Master’s degree are outlined in the North Carolina State University Graduate Catalog. Students are urged to review carefully the section pertaining to the degree sought.

Advisory Committee  At the Master’s level, the Advisory Committee shall consist of at least: 1) two members from the TECS graduate faculty, and 2) a third committee member who is a NC State University Graduate Faculty Member, but is not part of the TECS Core Faculty.
MS TE Option A (Thesis Degree) Program Requirements

  1. A minimum of 32 credit hours is required to fulfill the degree requirements. Of the 32 credits, a minimum of 24 credit hours (8 courses) are required from items 2 and 3 below.
  2. Students must take a minimum of five 3-credit courses at the ≥500 level offered by TECS faculty that have the following prefixes: TE, TMS, TC (PCC), TT, FPS, and TTM. View the lists of courses with these prefixes.
  3. Students must take a minimum of four 3-credit engineering courses at the ≥500 level (i.e., courses offered by an engineering department. Note: This includes courses with the TMS prefix).
  4. Six hours of TE 695 (Thesis Research) are required.
  5. Two semesters of TE 601 (Graduate Seminar) are required.

Note 1: Although classes may count in more than one area, eight classes are still required. For example, a student may take TE 505, TE 565, TE 566, MSE 5XX, TC 5XX, and TT 5XX fulfilling Requirements 2 & 3; however, the student would still need two additional graduate level classes.
Note 2: At least 18 credit hours must be letter graded courses at the 500 level or above.
Note 3: No minor is required.
Note 4: An Advisory Committee of at least three graduate faculty members is required with at least one being a non Core TECS Faculty Member.
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Master of Science in Textile Engineering (MS TE): Option B (Non-Thesis) Program Requirements

Non-Thesis (MS Option B) In order to obtain a MS TE degree under Option B, students must take a minimum of 32 credit hours, including 2 semesters (6 credit hours) of independent study, TE 630, to the satisfaction of the student’s advisor. Generally, research and thesis preparation courses (TC/TE 695, 699), which may be used in the MS Option A (thesis-based) track, may not be used to fulfill the course work requirements for the MS Option B degree. An exception is made for MS students on the way to a PhD degree. These individuals may count 6 hours of thesis research toward their degree. Students enrolled in this program option will develop a Plan of Graduate Work under the direction of his/her faculty advisor. Students in the Option B programs are not eligible for research assistantships.
MS TE Option B (Non-Thesis Degree) Program Requirements
1. A minimum of 32 credit hours is required to fulfill the degree requirements. Of the 32 credits, a minimum of 24 credit hours (8 courses) are required from items 2 and 3 below.
2. Students must take a minimum of five 3-credit courses at the ≥500 level that are offered by TECS faculty and have the following prefixes: TE, TMS, TC (PCC), TT, FPS, and TTM. View the lists of courses with these prefixes.
3. Students must take a minimum of four 3-credit engineering courses at the ≥500 level (i.e., courses offered by an engineering department. Note: This includes courses with the TMS prefix).
4. Six hours of TE 630 (Independent Study) or approved equivalent independent project courses are required.
5. Two semesters of TE 601 (Graduate Seminar) are required.
Note 1: Although classes may count in more than one area, eight classes are still required. For example, a student may take TE 505, TE 565, TE 566, MSE 5XX, TC 5XX, and TT 5XX fulfilling Requirements 2 & 3; however, the student would still need two additional graduate level classes.
Note 2: At least 18 credit hours must be letter graded courses at the 500 level or above.
Note 3: No minor is required.
Note 4: No committee and no final exam are required for this Option B. A Graduate Faculty member will be assigned as an advisor.

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Accelerated Bachelor’s Master’s Programs (ABM): BS / MS in Textile Engineering or Textile Technology / Textile Engineering

Accelerated Bachelor’s Master’s Programs (ABM) The Graduate School encourages and enables high performing undergraduate students to enter the Graduate School significantly prior to completing their BS degree. It also enables early graduation with a master’s degree by allowing double counting up to 12 credits for courses required in both the BS and MS degree. The faculty in the Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science participate in the ABM program because we believe in helping our top performing undergraduate chemists, engineers, and technologists to take on new challenges in their education and personal development. The ABM program is an outstanding opportunity to earn a challenging thesis or non-thesis master’s as early as possible and at reduced cost. Because eligible students have a very high GPA, we do not require the GRE to be taken for our ABM programs. Application Process: Eligible undergraduate students must take the following steps in their fourth or fifth semester:

  1. Contact the TECS Director of Graduate Programs stating their interest in applying to the ABM program, providing their student I.D. number, and requesting a meeting to discuss the Accelerated Bachelor’s Master’s program requirements.
  2. Complete a BS / MS Plan of Work form for the BS / MS signed by the student, and approved by the Director of Graduate Programs and the Director of Undergraduate Programs.
  3. Apply to the Graduate School online once the Plan of Work has been approved.

Note 1: Students must check the box to indicate they are applying to the ABM program. Note 2: Students must indicate that the requested admission date is the semester following their anticipated bachelor’s degree conferral semester. Note 3: Students are not required to take the GRE as they must have a GPA = 3.5 or higher.
BS / MS in Textile Engineering or Textile Technology / Textile Engineering Eligibility: While the department does not have a formalized BS / MS program in Textile Engineering, The Graduate School allows for individualized BS / MS programs on a case-by-case basis. Hence, students majoring in the BS Textile Engineering or Textile Technology degree who are in their fourth or fifth semester and have earned a GPA of 3.5 or higher are eligible to apply for acceptance into an individualized BS / MS TE or TT / TE Program. Learn more about the program and its requirements.
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Master’s Program Timeline of Key Requirements

This table shows a timeline of key required actions as part of your application process and during your time as a Master’s student.

Applying to the TECS Graduate Program

Required Action

Deadline

Who Initiates

Submit to

Submit Graduate School application along with all supporting documents.

View the deadlines.

Prospective student

The Graduate School (new window)

Complete online acceptance

ASAP upon receipt

Prospective student

The Graduate School (new window)

Arrival at NC State and Prior to Start of Fall Semester

Required Action

Deadline

Who Initiates

Submit to

Upon arrival, complete W-4, Selective Service , I-9 , and Patent Agreement Form

Immediately upon arrival at NC State

Student

Grad/Admin Support Specialist

Make an appointment online and Visit Office of International Services (new window) (OIS) with Passport and I-20

Immediately upon arrival at NC State

International students only

Submit hard copy proof of immunizations

Within 30 days of your acceptance at NC State University

International students only

Immunizations Department

immunizations@ncsu.edu

Attend OIS Orientation, Graduate School Orientation, TECS Graduate Student Orientation

Students will receive date, time, location information via Email.

The Graduate School (new window) and TECS Director of Graduate Programs

For US students only: Complete residency requirements (but do not submit residency requirement form until end of second semester).

IMPORTANT!

Within the first 10 days of classes

Students who are U.S. Citizens or have permanent resident status

After completing the requirements, contact: Residency_Officer@ncsu.edu 513-1287) to ensure your application will be accepted

1st Year of Graduate School

Required Action

Deadline

Who Initiates

Submit to

Students whose previous degree programs were not complete at the time of application are required to submit official transcripts showing degree(s) awarded and date(s).

Before the end of first semester of registration

Student

The Graduate School (new window)

Establish Advisory Committee and Submit Plan of Work form online (via MyPackPortal)

Before end of second semester of coursework

Student and Advisor

The Graduate School (new window)

Submit annual

Progress Report Form via the Graduate Student Online Academicy Reporting System http://www.ncsu.edu/grad/current-students/gsoars-students.html

May 31 of every year of enrollment

Student

The Graduate School (new window)

IMPORTANT!

Submit North Carolina Residency application.

Between 14 and 75 days prior to the beginning of the student’s third semester of classes

Student

The Graduate School (new window)

Attend Graduate School Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Workshop

By the end of Year 1

Student

The Graduate School (new window)

2nd Year of Graduate School

Required Action

Deadline

Who Initiates

Submit to

Submit “Request to Graduate” (via MyPackPortal)

Fourth Semester.

Due dates for each semester are posted here

Student

The Graduate School (new window)

Submit thesis draft to

Advisory Committee

At least two weeks prior to final oral exam

Student

Advisory Committee

Schedule final oral exam with Advisory Committee

Semester of expected graduation, at least 10 working days prior to proposed exam date

Student

Grad/Admin Support Specialist

Electronically
submit draft of thesis for review

Within 24 hours of passing the final oral exam

Student

thesis_editor@ncsu.edu

phone: (919) 515 4497

Revise thesis per Advisory Committee requirements and submit final thesis

Due dates for each semester

Student

The Graduate School (new window)

Schedule exit interview with the Director of Graduate Programs or Department Head

Immediately after passing the oral exam

Student

Director of Graduate Programs

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Plan of Work

All graduate students must develop and submit a Plan of Work (POW) prior to the end of their second semester. The POW identifies the graduate faculty that will be mentoring the student’s academic progress, the thesis topic, and the course work to be taken for the degree. The POW is submitted online via MyPackPortal and must include both a list of the course work to be undertaken (in all programs) and the thesis topic; be developed by the student and his/her advisory committee; and be approved by the advisory committee, the Director of Graduate Programs and the Graduate School. The student’s committee may request changes to future coursework, and it is essential that students discuss any changes with the committee before requesting any changes to the POW, which must be resubmitted with the same approvals as the original POW. If any course work diverges from the POW a new POW form must be submitted.
Read more about the POW and requirements.
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Doctor of Philosophy in Fiber and Polymer Science (PhD FPS)

This multidisciplinary program brings together the disciplines of mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering for the development of the independent scholars versed in the fields of polymer, fiber, and textile science. The polymer, fiber, and textile sciences are concerned with polymeric materials and fibers produced from them; textile assemblies in one, two, and three-dimensional forms; and the chemistry of dyeing, finishing, and other wet processes. This broad field of study permits a wide range of useful concentrations.
Learn More.
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Doctor of Philosophy in Textile Technology Management (PhD TTM)

The PhD in Textile Technology Management program is designed to educate students for research and management careers in textile technology management in the fiber, textile, apparel, retail and related industries complex, as well as for positions in government and academe.
Learn More.
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Financial Aid Overview

Financial aid in the form of assistantships or fellowships may be available for full-time students who apply early. These programs provide financial support to enable students to focus their work on their degrees. Student’s assignments should be in direct or general support of the teaching, research or extension missions of the university for the mutual benefit of the graduate students and his/her graduate program. In order to be eligible for graduate assistantships and fellowships, students must be admitted into the Graduate School in full graduate standing and be enrolled in the fall and spring semesters. Students must also be in good academic standing (with a 3.000 grade point average or higher), unless granted an exception by the Graduate School. It is the responsibility of the student to consult the Director of Graduate Programs for information on specific eligibility requirements.
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Assistantships

A Teaching Assistantship is provided to a student to directly participate in the teaching mission of the TECS department as an instructor of record, lab instructor, recitation leader, lab or lecture assistant; or to provide general support to the teaching mission of the department or program. Students can consult with the Director of Graduate Programs for information on Teaching Assistantships. A Research Assistantship is provided to a student to directly participate in the research mission of the TECS department, in the design of experiments, data collection, analysis, or reporting of research results in the student’s field of study, where research may, but is not required to, contribute directly to the student’s thesis or dissertation; or to provide general support to the research mission of the unit or discipline. Students who seek a research assistantship can acquire this through individual faculty members who have research projects that require a graduate student. Students can consult with the Director of Graduate Programs for information on Research Assistantships. While international students can typically find support by their second semester, they should be prepared to cover all expenses for the first and second semesters at least.
Assistantship Semester Credit Hour Requirement: Graduate students on half-time assistantship must register for a minimum of nine credit hours. Those who wish to take more than ten credit hours must have approval from the
TECS Director of Graduate Programs.
Graduate Student Support Plan (GSSP): The Graduate Student Support Plan is used to attract top students to NC State. Under the plan, students supported on a teaching or research assistantship or a fellowship receives health insurance benefits and tuition support. Please see the NC State Graduate Student Support Plan (GSSP) for more information.
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Fellowships

There are several fellowships available for graduate students. Not only does landing a fellowship provide financial stability, a fellowship:

  1. Pays more than stipends, don’t come with outside requirements in addition to your research, and are not dependent on department or PI support
  2. Is viewed very favorably by prospective employers.
  3. forces you to clearly articulate your research goals at the beginning of your degree program
  4. Provides an external review of your proposed research before you get started
  5. Allows you to explore research questions beyond your faculty advisor’s interest and/or funding

Below is a non-exhaustive list. You will receive excellent peer and faculty review before submitting and you will develop your writing skills.
National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Eligible applicants include US citizens pursuing a research based Master’s or doctoral degree in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM). Applicants should be early career graduate students: A graduating senior; have completed a B.S./B.A. degree in a STEM field; or are in their 1st year or the first semester of their 2nd year in graduate school. The fellowship lasts 3 years. Applications require 3 separate essays.
National Institute of Health Research Service Awards This fellowship is appropriate for US citizens & legal residents pursuing a health related Ph.D. aligned with an NIH center’s mission. The financial support may last up to 5 years.
Environmental Protection Agency Science to Achieve Results Applicants should be US citizens & legal residents pursuing an MS or Ph.D. Funding lasts 2 years for a Master’s student, and 3 for a Ph.D. Applying requires a personal statement and a work proposal.
Graduate Women in Science For women in science pursuing a MS or Ph.D. Funding lasts for 1 year. Applications include a 4 page proposal and a $25 fee.
Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans This fellowship is for individuals under 30 years old who (1) are a resident aliens, i.e., hold a Green Card; or, (2) have been naturalized as a US citizen, or (3) are children of a US naturalized parent (other parent cannot be US born). Apply if you are a graduating undergraduate or in your first 2 years of graduate study (MS or Ph.D). The fellowship lasts 2 years and requires 2 essays.
The Ford Foundation Predoctoral, Dissertation, and Postdoctoral Fellowships For US citizens & legal residents pursuing a Ph.D., Diversity criteria is viewed as a positive factor. Predoctoral students receive 3 years of funding, while postdoctoral and dissertation students receive 1 year of funding. The application requires 3 essays.
American Association of University Women Dissertation Fellowship Applicants should be women US citizens & legal residents pursuing a Ph.D. who have advanced to candidacy. There are also international fellowships available. Funding is provided for 1 year, and the application requires a budget and $40 fee.
Department of Defense National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship Research must be of interest to one of the branches of the military. This fellowship is for early career graduate students: A graduating senior; have completed a B.S./B.A. degree in a STEM field; or are in their 1st year or the first semester of their 2nd year in graduate school. Fellowship funding lasts 3 years.
Sigma Xi Grants in Aid of Research Program The program awards grants of up to $1,000 to students from all areas of the sciences and engineering. Students from any country may apply. While membership in Sigma Xi is not a requirement, approximately 75% of funds are restricted for use by dues paying student members of Sigma Xi or students whose project advisor is a dues paying member of Sigma Xi.
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Other Sources of Support

There are several sources of supplemental financial aid available on the campus, including:
Diversity Enhancement Grants: These grants are based on need, intended to add diversity to the student body, and do not increase or create a work obligation.
Alumni Association Graduate Fellowships: These are first-year-only supplements intended to attract superior graduate students. They are very competitive. Supplements are awarded across all university colleges/schools as a financial incentive above and beyond whatever fellowship or assistantship candidates have already been offered.
Andrews Fellowships: These are first-year-only supplements to attract superior graduate students. They are very competitive. Supplements are awarded across all university colleges/schools as a financial incentive above and beyond whatever fellowship or assistantship candidates have already been offered.
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Vacations and Holidays

Graduate research/teaching assistants (RAs and TAs), in their roles as employees of the TECS department, are expected to adhere to the working schedule of academic employees.  A student with a Research Assistantship is expected to participate in the research mission of the TECS department, and may be asked to assist in the design of experiments, data collection, analysis, or reporting of research results, in the general field of the student’s research, which may or may not contribute to the student’s thesis or dissertation, depending on the funding resource and the research adviser. A student with a Teaching Assistantship is expected to directly participate in the teaching mission of the TECS department as an instructor of record, lab instructor, recitation leader, lab or lecture assistant; or to provide general support to the teaching mission of the department or program. Research and teaching assistants who are ½ time employees would have a 20 hours per week service requirement while 1/4 time employees would have a 10 hours per week service requirement.  The service provided by research/teaching assistants is the obligation of their appointments, and does not replace the requirements of 600 or 800 level research/teaching courses. In addition to the service indicated above, graduate students are expected to dedicate sufficient time to make steady progress in their direct field of research. As employees of the University, research/teaching assistants observe University Official Holidays/Closings occurring during their specified appointment periods. Schedules for University Official Holidays/Closings are readily available from advisors or at https://hr.ncsu.edu/common-tasks/university-holidays-and-closings/. Spring break, Spring holiday and Fall break are not University Official Holidays/Closings, and do not apply to graduate research/teaching assistants. In addition to University Official Holidays/Closings, research/teaching assistants are entitled to two weeks (10 working days) of vacation each academic year. Vacation should be taken at a time approved by the student’s advisor. Research/teaching assistants whose appointments are less than ½ time or less than 12 months should discuss their vacation option with their advisor and the Director of Graduate Programs.
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Travel Grants

The Department or College may be able to partially fund students to attend conferences. However, funds are limited. Students must give an oral presentation (or poster) to be eligible for funding.
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Residency Requirements

Master’s Degree students are required to pursue graduate work in residence at NC State for a minimum of two academic years (four semesters) or its equivalent. The University has basic residence requirements, which are defined below. Residence credit is determined by the number of semester hours of graduate work carried during a regular semester.

During a Fall or Spring semester, residence credits are calculated as follows according to hours registered.

Semester Credits (Hours)

Residence Credits

9 or more hours

1

6-8 hours

2/3

Less than 6 hours (including registration for “DR Dissertation Preparation” or “DR Dissertation Research”

1/3

During either summer term residence credit equals one-half that of the corresponding credit for a regular term (e.g., six hours credit during a summer term equals 1/3 residence credit.) At least two residence credits are necessary in continuous residence (registration in consecutive semesters) as a graduate student at the University, but not taking courses in the summer does not break continuity. Summer course work, however, can be used in partial fulfillment of this requirement. A single summer session is equal to one-half of the corresponding amount for a regular semester. For example, six semester hours carried during a summer session will earn one-third of a residence credit; less than six credit hours will earn one-sixth of a residence credit.
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Obtaining Residence in North Carolina

Out-of-state U.S. Citizens or permanent residents that arrive at NC State for a degree program must begin establishing residency immediately upon arrival (international students – see the “International Student” section). Note: Only in-state tuition will be paid by the Graduate Student Support Plan after the first year. Two inquiries are made of students enrolled in North Carolina universities and colleges who desire to be classified as in-state students. First, students must demonstrate that they have in fact lived in North Carolina for a minimum period of twelve months immediately prior to enrollment or re-enrollment. Second, students must be able to demonstrate that their presence in the state constitutes legal residence. Under North Carolina law, legal residence means maintaining a domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) within the state, as opposed to a temporary residence such as a dormitory of a university. As a starting point, if a student has living parents, the domicile of the student is presumed to be that of his/her parents but may be changed to qualify for in-state tuition if the required legal residence can be demonstrated. Marriage does not prevent a student from becoming a legal resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage ensure that a person will become such a resident. More information on establishing residency details is available in the Graduate Office. If you are from out-of-state and need to establish residency to receive the in-state tuition rate after your first 12 months of attending NC State, the most basic requirements upon arrival are:

  1. Establish a NC address where you receive mail and are physically present for 12 months. You can move to another location as long as you remain in NC for the 12 month minimum requirement.
  2. Obtain a NC driver’s license at the Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV). For this you will need your Social Security card, something that proves your address is real (like a utilities bill addressed to you), and possibly a birth certificate, proof of auto insurance (even if you don’t have a car). You will have to bring your out-of-state driver’s license to the DMV to be relinquished. See https://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/license-id/driver-licenses/Pages/default.aspx for a more comprehensive list of required documents. While at the DMV, you have the option of registering to vote. To register, you must be a US citizen, will have been a resident of NC for 30 days before an election, and must not be registered to vote in any other state. See the voter registration website for ways to register other than at the DMV: http://www.ncsbe.gov.
  3. If you have a car and if your name is the only name on the title, you are going to have to register the vehicle and get new NC plates. To do so you will need to bring the correct forms (many of which overlap with #2 above). To see specifically what you will need and where to find a Vehicle and License Plate office (different from where you get your license) go to https://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/title-registration/Pages/default.aspx.

The order in which you do the above tasks may be important. First, change your insurance information to reflect that the vehicle is now in NC. Some insurance companies are not licensed to insure vehicles in NC. In this case you will have to get an entire new policy with a company that is licensed for NC. If you do not have a car, you can still get insurance from any insurance company that is specific to the driver and not a vehicle. Flash forward 12 months: you have done everything listed above, and maybe even more. If you started your program in the fall semester, then the long and personal residency application is open for you to start filling out on June 1st, and closes on the 10th day of classes in the fall semester. If your program started in the spring semester, your application window opens October 1st, and closes on the 10th day of classes of the spring semester. Remember, you should not submit the form until 12 months after you began to complete the residency requirements. That is why it is so important that you begin checking off those residency requirements upon arrival. You can find a link to the application on the tuition & residency website listed above. Be prepared to spend a few hours to a few days on this form. There is an essay portion where you will explain why you’re a North Carolina resident and why you plan on staying in NC. You may have to have your parents fill out a separate form certifying that you are financially independent of them. If so, your parents will have to notarize the form and mail it. Even more reasons why you should not procrastinate on the required steps of this process! Even after all of this, your application for residency may be denied: “Evidence of North Carolina domicile for tuition purposes includes actions that would normally be characteristic and expected of any permanent resident. A variety of evidence is considered when evaluating requests for instate tuition status; however, no single factor or combination of factors may be considered conclusive evidence of domicile.” It would be helpful to your residency application if you are able to state that you are an active member of a society or organization within North Carolina.
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International Students

Even though international students cannot establish NC residency, there are still a few tasks that should be completed upon arrival. A very helpful workshop is offered every year for new international students by the Office of International Services (OIS) typically near the end of August (you will get an email requesting that you register for the workshop). The workshop helps you through the following tasks:

  1. Getting a social security card. For this you will need:
    1. Your passport with your Visa
    2. The I-20 form
    3. The I-94 card
    4. A contract letter proving your job status with a signature from the department head. Make sure it is an original – not a copy – that includes your job title, start date, work location, and salary.
    5. And a social security application form
  2. Getting auto insurance. Even if you don’t have a car, you might be required to drive a state vehicle at some point. Insurance companies offer driver insurance which covers the driver and not a particular vehicle.
  3. With your new insurance, you can now get a NC driver’s license. It is much easier to use a NC driver’s license for ID purposes than a passport. For this you are going to need your new social security card, something that proves your address is real (like a utility bill addressed to you), possibly a birth certificate, and proof of the auto insurance you just purchased. See https://www.ncdot.gov/dmv/license-id/driver-licenses/Pages/default.aspx for a more comprehensive list of required documents.

If you are an international student and you’re planning your arrival, be sure to
make arrangements for airport pick-up and temporary housing. The deadline for requesting these services is mid July, so make sure to do this as early as possible. See the OIS webpage at http://www.ncsu.edu/ois/ for more information on activities offered for international students.
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Time Limits

Each semester graduate students must make progress toward the M.S. degree based on the POW originally submitted. Whether studying full-time or part-time, students must complete the Master’s program within 6 years, beginning with the date the student commences courses that carry graduate credit applicable to the degree program. Requests for a Leave of Absence must be made in writing and submitted to the Director of Graduate Programs.
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Roles of Key Personnel in the Administration of the Graduate Program: The Student

The management of a student’s graduate program of study is largely in the hands of the student as guided and constrained by the Department and by the rules of the Graduate School, as defined in the Graduate School Handbook: https://grad.ncsu.edu/students/rules-and-regulations/handbook/. Should an issue arise, immediate action should be taken to resolve the issues utilizing the Advisory Committee chair or the TECS Director of the Graduate Programs. Students should also keep the Graduate Office informed of their current addresses and telephone numbers and respond immediately to any requests for documents or information.
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Roles of Key Personnel in the Administration of the Graduate Program: The Advisor

The Director of the Graduate Programs (DGP) will be the advisor for all graduate students upon arrival at NC State. For students pursuing a non-thesis degree (Option B), the DGP will remain the students’ advisor for the duration of their program. For all other students, as early as possible, a permanent advisor will be identified (usually by the student). The advisor must be a member of the Graduate Faculty who is a member of the TECS Department. This advisor will either serve as chair or co-chair of the student’s Advisory Committee.
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Roles of Key Personnel in the Administration of the Graduate Program: Advisory Committees

An Advisory Committee is required for all students pursuing a Masters degree with thesis (Option A). The TECS department recommends that an Advisory Committee be selected and appointed for each student no later than the end of the second semester of graduate study. This committee replaces the interim advisor and the committee chair becomes the principal advisor. Graduate School policy states that the committee members and chair (co-chairs) are selected by the student on his/her consent with the advice and approval of the Head and/or Director of Graduate Programs. The chair and committee are ultimately approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. Early selection of the Advisory Committee can provide the student with guidance especially suited to his/her interests and assures that an appropriate plan of work is developed and followed. The Advisory Committee will act as the student’s academic advisory body throughout the pursuit of a graduate degree. The Advisory Committee is expected to be available for student program planning, discussion of professional development, and consultation and direction on thesis research. Committee members are expected to be well acquainted with the student’s progress at all times after the committee’s formation. A student should be certain to keep the committee members fully informed of progress toward the degree. An annual report is required by the Graduate School. It must be submitted via The Graduate Student Online Advising and Reporting System (GSOARS; http://www.ncsu.edu/grad/current-students/gsoars-students.html), as well as at least one meeting with the Advisory Committee prior to submission of each Annual Report. At the Master’s level, the Advisory Committee consists of at least two members from the TECS graduate faculty and a third committee member must be a member of the graduate faculty in another discipline in which the student has taken course work. The chair and student may elect to have a committee composed of more than three members. As soon as possible after the appointment of the Advisory Committee, a meeting should be held with the major advisor to prepare a Plan of Graduate Work (see Plan of Work section). Students will not be cleared for graduation or permitted to schedule an oral thesis defense examination in a given semester unless the plan of work for the degree program has been approved. Changes in the membership of the Advisory Committee are possible, but should be done by mutual consent of all parties involved (the student, the faculty member being dropped and/or added) and by the chair (or co-chairs) of the Advisory Committee. Permission of the Director of Graduate Programs and the Graduate School is required to make changes to the Advisory Committee. A faculty member from another university or a professional from industry or government (with credentials comparable to those required for membership on the Graduate Faculty) may serve as an external member, along with the required committee composed of members of the NC State Graduate Faculty. It will be necessary to provide credentials to the Director of Graduate Programs, and, if full voting rights are sought, the Graduate School.
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Roles of Key Personnel in the Administration of the Graduate Program: TECS Director of Graduate Programs

The TECS Director of Graduate Programs supervises the graduate program and reports to the Department Head. The normal business of graduate program approval, committee selection, interpretation of graduate requirements, communication with the Graduate School, representation of graduate student requests to the Department or Graduate School, supervision of the Department’s Graduate Office, recommendation of changes in the graduate program, resolution of advisor-advisee differences, assessment of the graduate program, recruitment of graduate students, and related duties, will be handled by the Director of Graduate Programs. Although the Director will respond to the diverse program needs of graduate students and advisors, it is assumed that all methods of problem resolution between the parties themselves have been exhausted prior to bringing the matter to the attention of the Director.
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Roles of Key Personnel in the Administration of the Graduate Program: TECS Graduate Program Committee

The TECS Graduate Program Committee is chaired by the Director of Graduate Programs and consists of the Program Directors of Textile Engineering, Polymer & Color Chemistry, and Textile Technology. The Committee is charged with reviewing and making recommendations on acceptance or denial of applications of prospective graduate students. The Committee also advises the Department Head on graduate student recruitment.
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Roles of Key Personnel in the Administration of the Graduate Program: The Graduate School

All students are reminded that this handbook on graduate study pertains to the TECS Department and that the general requirements for Masters degrees is controlled and administered by the Graduate School as outlined in the NC State Graduate Catalog: http://www.ncsu.edu/grad/handbook/index.php.
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Continuous Registration Policy

After a student is admitted to the Graduate School and enrolls for the first time, he/she is required to maintain continuous registration, i.e., be enrolled each semester, excluding summer sessions, until he/she has either graduated or his/her graduate program has been terminated. The following caveats and exceptions apply:

  1. A student in good academic standing who must interrupt his/her graduate program for good reasons may request a leave of absence from graduate study for a definite period of time, normally not to exceed one year. The student should initiate the request with the chair of his/her Advisory Committee and have it endorsed by the Director of Graduate Programs before submitting it to the Graduate School. The request should be received by the Graduate School at least one month prior to the first day of the term involved.
  2. All students who take their oral thesis defense or submit their thesis to the Graduate School during either summer session must be registered for either the first or second summer session.
  3. Students who complete all requirements for the degree prior to the first day of the fall or spring semester or the first summer session may graduate during the next semester or summer session without being registered as long as they were registered in the immediately preceding semester or summer (either session).
  4. In order for students to submit their thesis to the Graduate School or have their oral thesis defense after the last day of a semester or summer session but before the first day of the next semester or summer session, they must have been registered in the semester or summer (either session) which immediately preceded the date that the thesis or dissertation was submitted or the exam was held.
  5. Students whose only remaining requirement for graduation is removal of an “IN” in a course are not required to be registered to remove the IN and graduate. However, students who do not remove any remaining IN grade(s) in the semester or summer following completion of all other requirements and are not registered during the same semester or summer will be terminated at the end of that semester or summer due to non-compliance with the continuous registration policy.

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Grading

The Department follows Graduate School policy with regard to grading and academic standing. In order to receive graduate degree credit, a grade of “C” or higher is required. All grades on courses taken for graduate credit as an undergraduate at North Carolina State University and all grades on courses taken in a graduate classification at North Carolina State University in courses numbered 500 level and above are included in the calculation of the grade point average. While a student may take a S/U graded courses (with their Advisory Committee’s approval), S/U grades are not used in computing the grade point average and will not be included in the number of credits required for graduation. A student who receives a “U” will receive no credit for the course and may be required to repeat it. A student who receives an “IN” (incomplete) must complete the unfinished work by the end of the next semester in which the student is enrolled provided that this period is not longer than 12 months from the end of the semester or summer session in which the incomplete was received. Otherwise, the “IN” will be automatically converted to “F” or “U”. All grades of “IN” must be cleared prior to graduation. Master’s students are expected to earn a grade of “B” or higher in all their courses. Academic achievement is considered by the Department in establishing priorities for departmental support.
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Dropping Courses

Courses at the 500 level and above may be dropped during a semester up to one week after the mid-semester and during a summer session up to the first half of the total class days (see the University calendar for the last days to drop and add). Thereafter no drops shall be allowed except for documented medical reasons or other verified, unforeseen grounds of personal or family hardship. Exceptions to the drop policies require the recommendation of the chair of the student’s Advisory Committee, the Director of Graduate Programs, the Department Head, and approval by the Dean of the student’s college and the Dean of the Graduate School. Late drops require the submission of a schedule revision form signed by the Director of Graduate Programs, documentation of extenuating circumstance, such as illness or unforeseen personal hardship, and letter from the Director of Graduate Programs as to why this action is justified.
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Graduate Standing

A notice of academic warning is issued to graduate students who have accumulated fewer than nine hours of course work and have less than a 3.0 grade point average (“B” average). Graduate students are placed on academic probation if they accumulate nine or more but fewer than 18 credit hours and have a grade point average of less than 3.0. A student’s graduate program is terminated if 18 or more credit hours are accumulated with a grade point average of less than 3.0. In the latter case, no further registration in a graduate classification will be permitted. Under special circumstances a student will be reinstated upon the written recommendation of the Director of Graduate Programs and approval by the Graduate School. Furthermore, the Department has the prerogative of recommending the termination of a student’s graduate admission at any time. If a student receives a notice of “Graduate Admission Terminated” at the end of the first summer session, the student may register for the second summer session unless the Department recommends otherwise. A student who receives such a note should confer with the DGP before registering for the second summer session. Once admitted, a graduate student must maintain a “B” or better average to remain eligible for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship, or traineeship and must be registered each semester during which the appointment is in effect.
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Course Credit from Other Universities

In general, at the Master’s level, no courses taken at other institutions will be accepted as counting toward TECS Masters degrees. In rare cases that courses are allowed to be transferred from another institution, grades from these courses will not be included in computing the grade point average.
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Criteria for Assessment of Normal Progress Towards Degree

It is recognized that no absolute criteria for evaluating progress toward a degree are appropriate. The following criteria may be used for:

  • Program Assessment
  • Decisions concerning offering or continuing assistantships
  • Establishing priorities for other types of departmental support

Maintenance of a Normal Course Load. A student is expected to enroll in nine hours (three courses) per semester until they have finished all required course work. Students should not drop courses in which they are enrolled unless there are compelling medical or personal reasons for doing so. Appropriateness of Courses. The courses that a student takes should be consistent with the degree program in which the student is enrolled. A plan of work should be completed during the second semester of enrollment in the degree. Avoidance of Incomplete Grades. Incomplete grades are to be assigned only when “the student’s record in the course is such that the successful completion of particular assignments, projects, or tests missed as a result of a documented serious event would enable that student to pass the course.” The time required in the subsequent semester to make up an incomplete grade can be detrimental to the student’s progress. A grade of incomplete can be regarded as evidence of lack of normal progress toward degree. Maintenance of Good Scholastic Standing. Probationary status/academic warnings are signals that normal progress toward the degree is in jeopardy. A “B” average is sufficient to remain in the program, and an accumulated GPA in excess of 3.0 is required.
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Completion of Outstanding Degree Requirements

A graduate student who establishes a graduation date by enrolling in the last course(s) on the plan of work or submitting to the Graduate School a thesis by the deadline for that semester and who does not meet all the requirements (incomplete grades, corrections in thesis or dissertation, etc.) by the graduation date is put on “hold” for a period of thirty days following graduation. The Graduate School will notify the student and his/her Director of Graduate Programs of this action by letter. If the student does not complete the outstanding requirement within thirty days after the graduation date, his/her name is removed from the graduation list and added to the next graduation list following the removal of the outstanding requirement. If the student’s time limit for the degree expires after the 30-day hold period but before the outstanding requirement is met, his/her graduate program will be terminated unless a request for extension is submitted to and approved by the Graduate School.
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Registering for Classes

An advising hold is placed on students’ records at the beginning of each semester preventing a student from registering. This helps ensure that all students receive advising from their advisor prior to registering for any classes. If a student has already been assigned an Advisor, the student will need to contact his/her Advisor to release the HOLD on his/her account. New students will be contacted by the Director of Graduate Programs a few weeks prior to the start of their first semester with instructions on signing up for classes and when the HOLD will be released.
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Curriculum Vitae

All graduate students should have a current copy of a curriculum vitae or resume in their files. The TECS Graduate Scholars Program will have activities that include development of an an effective vitae or resume. Also, the Graduate Student Online Academic Reporting System has the capability to assist students in developing a CV. The student’s major advisor will help the student develop their vitae as well.
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Textile Association of Graduate Students (TAGS)

Mission Statement Composed of approximately 200 students, the mission of the Textile Association of Graduate Students is to be the platform for the Wilson College of Textiles’ graduate students to share ideas in an inclusive environment, to network and socialize, and to learn from each other.
TAGS Core Values
Community: Form a supportive community among graduate students to provide guidance and build friendships.
Opportunity: Spread helpful information and advocate for the interests of graduate students in College and University affairs.
Loyalty: Help fulfill the potential and vision of the Wilson College of Textiles and find ways to give back to the community.
Life-Long Learning: To inspire ourselves and those with whom we interact to develop a passion for life-long learning.
Organizational Structure All textile graduate students are members of TAGS and are welcome to attend all TAGS-sponsored meetings and events. Each spring students are elected to the positions of President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and Public Relations Officer. These officers organize events and act as representatives between the graduate student body and administrators, professors, and other organizations of interest. Multiple events are planned each academic year including: holding meetings to discuss topics of interest, providing snacks for the weekly seminar, leading trips, and hosting social events. TAGS is the Wilson College of Textiles’ chapter of the UGSA. A representative from TAGS sits on the UGSA council and represents the interests and concerns of the students to the university. TAGS is also represented in the Tompkins Textile Student Council, the student government of the Wilson College of Textiles.
Links Get involved! For up to date information on TAGS and Wilson College of Textiles events join our facebook group.
University Graduate Student Association
http://www.ncsu.edu/grad/student-life/
http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/graduatestudents
Wilson College of Textiles Student Organizations
Career Services
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University Graduate Student Association (UGSA)

The NC State University Graduate Student Association (UGSA) is a university-wide organization representing all graduate students. It is composed of elected officials from departmental graduate student associations and serves as the institutionalized channel through which NC State graduate students voice their concerns as a group. The UGSA serves advocacy, social, and communicative functions. It distributes information of interest to graduate students (e.g., names of manuscript typists and information on income tax status of graduate assistantships), sponsors student get-togethers, maintains a travel fund which supports graduate student activity at professional meetings, and provides funding to individual departmental graduate student organizations. Additionally, this group sponsors an annual awards ceremony in recognition of outstanding graduate teaching assistants within the university. TECS graduate students are welcome to attend UGSA business meetings which are held each month.
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Honor Societies

Graduate students at North Carolina State University with outstanding academic records are eligible for membership in nationally and internationally recognized honor societies. These organizations also support various special awards. Phi Kappa Phi is widely regarded as the equivalent of Phi Beta Kappa for colleges and universities with an emphasis on the sciences. Because of the small proportion of students who can be invited to join the society each year, graduate students must achieve a 4.0 average in their graduate programs in order to be admitted. Sigma Xi is a scientific research society that recognizes outstanding students as nominated by members of the society. Students have to show evidence of scholarly productivity beyond thesis research and be nominated by two existing members.
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Office Assignments

There are several graduate student offices with desks for graduate students in the College. Please see TECS Staff in 3270 to inquire about the availability.
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Travel Procedures

Please contact your advisor to inquire about department / advisor sponsored travel to conferences by using the
comprehensive travel procedure and accompanying forms.
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Fax

The departmental fax number is 919.515.6532. The fax machine is located in 3270.
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Mail

All mail for the department is delivered to the staff office of 3270. TECS Staff will contact you if you receive any mail. Physical Address: 1020 Main Campus Drive, Raleigh, NC 27606 Mailing Address: Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science Campus Box 8301, 1020 Main Campus Drive, Raleigh, NC 27695-8301. Please note that any mail delivered by The United States Postal Service (USPS) MUST include our Campus Box as listed above – otherwise, it will not be delivered or it will take a very long time to be delivered.
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Supplies

Supplies can be ordered by TECS Staff by filling out a PO form that is signed by your advisor and the Department Head. Forms may be given to TECS Staff (3270) either electronically (with your advisor’s electronic signature or email with their permission) or as a paper copy. TECS Staff will obtain the Department Head’s signature and place the order.
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TECS Forms and Documents

Pertinent forms and documents
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Map of Campus

NC State University Campus Map
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Campus ID: WolfPack One Card

Students are required to have a Wolfpack One Card. The card serves as a student identification card and gives access to multiple services, including the libraries, the gym, door access to the College, student health services and special events. When money is deposited on the card, it can be used to manage on-campus expenses. The Wolfpack One Card office is located in the Talley Student Center. You must be registered for classes before a Wolfpack One Card will be issued.
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Campus ID #

Your Campus ID number is a 9 digit number (no letters) that is assigned to you and can be found on your Wolfpack One Card. It is the same thing as your Student ID Number and your Employee ID Number (if you work for NC State).
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Unity ID

Your Unity ID is a collection of letters (and sometimes numbers) that is generated from your initials and your last name. This has 8 or fewer characters. Your Unity ID is used for your email address (example – Unity ID = ncsutecs, then the email = ncsutecs@ncsu.edu), to log in to MyPack Portal, for secure websites and other IT resources. Learn more about the Unity ID.
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Email

Email accounts – called Unity Accounts — for new students are automatically generated after admission has been granted. The Unity account allows students to access the campus computing resources, register with SIS online, and access and maintain student information. Students’ user IDs are based on first and middle initials and up to the first six letters of the last name. The initial password for student user IDs is set to the students’ social security number.
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